No Clique-ing

Mozzie:  There are so many benefits to being us.

Atlas:  Like getting petted.

Rico:  And not having to go to work.

Mozzie:  I think one of the best things is that we don’t have to deal with cliques.

Atlas:  You usually get a treat right after the click.

Rico:  That’s a different thing.  That’s from a clicker.  A clique is completely different.

Mozzie:  Yes, it’s an unfortunate thing that humans create.

Atlas:  How do they work?

Rico:  Well, some people become friends, and then they don’t let other people also be their friends and/or they judge and are mean to people who aren’t in their inner circle.

Mozzie:  Mom really hates cliques.

Atlas:  Is that kind of like those obedience people who whisper, sometimes pretty loudly, about how they think that positive only training is dumb and how they’d train us differently?

Rico:  Yes.  Or people who get all snooty because they think their dog is better than us because some judge liked their dog better that day.

Mozzie:  I saw how some people treated Mom at the Specialty or ignored her when she said hi, and it made me sad.

Atlas:  Is that why she’s thinking of dropping out of the Bernese Mountain Dog Club of America and the Bernese Mountain Dog Club of Northern California?

Rico:  Yes.  She loves us, but she says it reminds her of high school.

Mozzie:  And she really didn’t like high school.

Atlas:  I’m glad we don’t have a clique.

Rico:  Me, too!

Mozzie:  Humans aren’t as nice as dogs are.

 

Tendon-C

Atlas:  What’s wrong with Mom’s wrist?

Mozzie:  She either has severe tendonitis or a tear in the tendon that that attaches her pinky to her hand and wrist.

Rico:  It’s a good thing Mom went to the doctor today so she could get the brace for her wrist.

Atlas:  I don’t know what a tendon is, but I can see that Mom has her fingers and thumb still exposed.

Mozzie:  Yes.  The tendon is down in her wrist below her palm.

Rico:  The doctor said she’s hoping this will work and get things healed.  Mom has to let the doctor know in two weeks if it’s helping.

Atlas:  Did the doctor say anything about restrictions on petting?

Mozzie:  I think she said Mom could only pet dogs who were 24″ or more at the withers.

Rico:  I think that’s right.

Atlas:  I don’t understand what that would have to do with it.

Mozzie:  You are really gullible.

Rico:  Yes, he is!

Atlas:  Is that a good thing?  If I’m gullible can Mom pet me even if I’m short?

Strengths

Rico:  Did you hear that Mom is supposed to be doing something for work where she asks people who know her to provide input about her strengths?

Mozzie:  Yes.  She’s not super gung-ho about asking people to provide her feedback.

Atlas:  I could give her a list.

Rico:  I think we all could, but she didn’t ask us.

Mozzie:  Mom’s like that.  She gets uncomfortable when people say nice things, and asking them to say nice things is even harder for her. She’s not like me.  I mean, really, when I stand there, people are going to just tell me how handsome and amazing I am, so I’m used to it.

Atlas:  Same here.  I am super popular at Dutch Brothers, and I even have friends who make me pupuccinos with extra sprinkles and extra whipped cream and bones.  They say I’m the cutest, fluffiest dog ever.

Rico:  People tell me I’m brave and have come a long way since I was rescued from that puppy mill.

Mozzie:  Mom’s got some strengths, too.  She can read my mind.  When I look at her, she knows if I want a treat, some petting, or a walk.

Atlas:  And she tells me I’m cute.

Rico:  That’s about you, not Mom.

Mozzie:  She does know how to treat each of us differently, so that we all feel special.  I think that’s a strength.

Atlas:  She has strong hands, so I can feel her pet me even with all my fur.

Rico:  That’s about you, again.  Try this:  Mom knows how to help me feel safe even when it’s super scary like New Year’s Eve or July 4th.  She even got me some drugs to help me cope.  Looking out for our well-being is a strength.

Mozzie:  Yes!  And she cares more about our happiness than anything.  I don’t ever have to pull a cart if I don’t want to.  I know Mom would like that, but she knows it scares me, so she doesn’t make me do it.

Atlas:  I think I understand now.  Mom knows where to order the best treats!

Rico:  That’s more like it, At-hat.

Mozzie:  We all know she’s awesome.  I think it’s mostly at work where people keep it a secret.  Maybe that’s why they have to do this activity.  I’ll be sure she adds our items to her strengths list.

Smell the Roses

Mom’s always saying how she should make time to stop and smell the roses.  Apparently she’s been watching me sniff, and she’s seen how much fun it is.

Since we live in California, we have roses blooming nearly all year, including in January.  Yesterday when we were on our daily walk, I decided I’d add Mom’s idea to my usual sniffing routine.  There were some lovely red roses on our path, so I decided to go see what all the excitement was about.

Roses DO smell amazing and their petals are soft on my nose.  What Mom didn’t mention was that they also attack you!  She did warn me to take it easy and back off, but I was so busy sniffing, I tuned her out.  The next thing I knew, one of those nasty thorns jumped out at the bridge of my nose.  I’m usually tough, but yikes, that hurt, so I yelped.  Everyone looked around to see what was wrong.  Clearly they haven’t been attacked by thorns, or they’d understand what happened.

I warned Mom about those roses and told her to sniff at her own peril.  I’ll stick with smelling pee-mail and my friends’ posts.  They never attack me.

-Moz